Vice Presidential Symposium

Sunday, 10 January 2021, 11:00-2:30 PM UTC -5

Organizer: Meghan Duffy, Vice-President, University of Michigan

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Speakers are asked to join the Zoom Meeting (link in Program sent by e-mail) for this session 10 minutes before it begins.

All times are given for the Eastern Standard (UTC -5) time zone.

ID Time Presenter Title
11:20 AM Meghan Duffy Introduction
S1 11:30 AM Nina Wale The use and underuse of model systems in the study of host-parasite interactions
S2 12:00 PM Nkrumah Grant Genotypic and phenotypic consequences of relaxed selection on anaerobic growth spanning 60,000 generations in a long-term evolution experiment with Escherichia coli
S3 12:30 PM Carlos Garcia-Robledo Demographic attritions, elevational refugia, and the resilience of insect populations to projected global warming
S4 1:00 PM D. André Green Developing the Monarch Butterfly as an Integrative Eco-Evo-Devo Model
S5 1:30 PM Swanne Gordon Sex- and morph-biased dispersal affect population structure and polymorphism: a test using a 'non-model' model
S6 2:00 PM Rachel Penczykowski Plantago spp. as models for studying plant-pathogen and plant-herbivore interactions across environmental gradients



Symposium Participants:

S1

The use and underuse of model systems in the study of host-parasite interactions

Nina Wale, Ecology And Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan

Abstract


S2

Genotypic and phenotypic consequences of relaxed selection on anaerobic growth spanning 60,000 generations in a long-term evolution experiment with Escherichia coli

Nkrumah Grant, Department of Microbiology & Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University

Abstract


S3

Demographic attritions, elevational refugia, and the resilience of insect populations to projected global warming

Carlos Garcia-Robledo, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut

Tropical mountains might protect species from global warming by facilitating biotic migrations upslope. Current predictions of tropical biotic responses to global warming are based on correlations between species elevational distributions and temperatures. Because biotic attritions, range shifts, and mountaintop extinctions result from complex demographic processes, predictive models must be based on mechanistic associations between temperature and fitness. Our study combines long-term temperature records with experimental demography to determine the contribution of local adaptation to organismal resilience in a warming world. On the Barva Volcano in Costa Rica, Cephaloleia belti (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) displays high (960-2100 m a.s.l) and low-elevation (50-960 m a.s.l.) mitochondrial haplotypes. We reared haplotype cohorts at temperatures prevalent along the elevational gradient (i.e., 10-30°C). Based on ambient temperatures recorded every half hour for four years, we projected average instantaneous population growth rates (r ̅) at current and future temperatures (i.e., +1-6°C) for each beetle haplotype. Haplotypes are adapted to local temperatures, but with a temperature increase beyond 2°C, both haplotypes will face lower-elevation demographic attritions and extinctions. Upper distribution limits serve as potential elevational refugia from global warming. This study shows how species resilience to global warming emerges from complex fitness responses of locally adapted phenotypes facing novel environments.


S4

Developing the Monarch Butterfly as an Integrative Eco-Evo-Devo Model

D. André Green, Ecology And Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan

Abstract


S5

Sex- and morph-biased dispersal affect population structure and polymorphism: a test using a 'non-model' model

Swanne Gordon, Department of Biology, Washington University in St. Louis

Abstract


S6

Plantago spp. as models for studying plant-pathogen and plant-herbivore interactions across environmental gradients

Rachel Penczykowski, Department of Biology, Washington University in St. Louis

Abstract